Are Fences Allowed in Continental Country Club?

A question I often get is whether fences are allowed in Flagstaff’s Continental Country Club. For the most part they’re non-existent. The general feel of the Country Club area is that of being in the forest, which is appealing to many residents as well as vacation homeowners who prefer to feel like they’re coming to Flagstaff to be in the pines and enjoy the natural landscape, which is far different than that of the desert. A lack of fencing also better conforms to being on a golf course – it would really take away from the scenery if the fairways were surrounded by wood-plank fences and large walls. Lastly, the openness of the yards allows and encourages the flow of forest animals. It’s always a pleasure to look out your window and see a herd of deer or a magnificent elk in your yard.

That being said, many people mistakenly rule out the Country Club area thinking that they can’t have a fence. Whether you want a fence to keep your kids or pets in the yard, or to add some privacy, it’s likely very possible to have your needs met while working within the guidelines of the Country Club’s covenants.

So to dispel the myth that fences are prohibited in the Country Club, here’s the exact wording from Paragraph 3f of the Continental Country Club’s CC&Rs (Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions) regarding the installation of fences:

“Solid fences, walls and hedges around the perimeter of the lot will not be permitted under ordinary circumstances, and in no event shall a fence, wall or hedge be erected, installed or maintained nearer than 25 feet of any property line bordering on a golf course property as designated by the Association. As regulated by the rules and regulations, the following fencing may be approved by the Architectural Committee:

i. Split rail fences for landscape purposes.
ii. Privacy fences for purposes such as: dog run, private courtyards and storage.
iii. Privacy screens as detached landscape features to block or screen views.
iv. Ornamental wrought iron fences, if consistent with other landscape features. All other types of metal fences, such as chain link or wire, are prohibited.“

Did you notice that dog runs and private courtyard are possible? Also, please take note that it says, “may be approved…” The Architectural Committee will have to approve any fencing proposals, so there’s no guarantee they will approve what you have in mind. However, there are many examples of these types of fences in the Continental Country Club that have gotten approved. Here are a couple examples:

As you can see, there are many possibilities here. You definitely won’t be putting up a wood-plank fence around the perimeter, but with a little creativity, you can likely achieve what you want and, therefore, still be able to include the Continental Country Club neighborhood in your home search.

Disclosure: I am just passing along public information – this is in no way a guarantee for your specific circumstance. Also, these covenants are changed from time to time, so they could be different when you’re reading this. When it comes time to purchase, “it’s always a good idea to seek legal counsel if you have questions about the governing documents or rules” as stated by the National Association of Realtors.

Dues change in Continental Country Club

Members of Flagstaff’s Continental Country Club have seen somewhat increased dues for 2012. A full membership is now $400 per year and an associate membership is $285.

The full membership has access to all of Continental’s amenities, such as the pool, tennis courts, fitness center, and a discount on golf. They also have access to the Bear Paw Activity Center, which has an outdoor pool, kids splash pool, hot tub, basketball court, and games, movies, etc. for the kids.

The associate membership includes architectural review and CC&R compliance (the HOA drives through the areas regularly), which are good features for resale. Plus, according to Continental, associate members can upgrade to a full membership on a year-by-year basis by paying the difference.

The default type of membership is determined by the subdivisions within Continental.

Of course, when you consider that the annual fee is per property and not per person, the full membership is a very good value for what you receive in amenities.

In related news, Continental’s new restaurant, to replace Jotini’s, will be opening very soon and will be called Jake’s on the Green.

New Toddler Park in Boulder Pointe

The neighborhood of Boulder Pointe in Flagstaff finally has their own neighborhood park. It’s a small toddler park (or “tot park”) with swings and playground equipment. The HOA and homeowners had to take matters into their own hands and build the park in what was an HOA-owned lot used as a drainage basin.

This is a private park for Boulder Pointe residents and is meant as a “walking” park as there is no parking for the park.

Neighborhood parks are always great for the sense of community and I’m sure the residents of Boulder Pointe will be pleased to finally have a place to take their young ones.